Young People and Drug Use

Your Teen and Drug Use The causes behind teenager drug abuse are complicated. Experts have linked teenage drug abuse with nearly everything, from peer pressure to a simple curiosity about the drugs in question. Regardless of the cause in question, teenage drug abuse is still ongoing, even after decades of drug awareness programs directed at young people. Drug use among even younger children is not unheard of, unfortunately, and some teenage drug users may already have a long history of using drugs. The consequences of sustained drug abuse are very complex. Teenage drug abuse will have different consequences than adult drug abuse, simply because of where teenagers are in their lives, and the importance of these formative years. While some high-functioning drug users stay in school and work, their schoolwork still may suffer, and they may have strained relationships with their parents and friends.

Depending on their home environments, however, teenagers in some ways may have an advantage over older people when it comes to getting their lives back on track as they begin to recover. When older people succumb to debilitating drug addictions, they may lose their jobs, their health insurance benefits, and their entire safety nets. When teenagers in stable homes struggle with drug addiction, they may have to delay their high school graduations and their progress in life, but the consequences could still potentially be less severe. Entering rehab while in high school and still dependent on your parents may work out better than entering rehab and living off your savings, or some benefits.

Of course, teenagers who struggle with drug addictions for extended periods of time could find themselves without college degrees or high school diplomas, making entering the job market excessively difficult for them. The long-term medical consequences of teenage drug use will vary from person to person, but if it affects the growth process, it could cause irreversible damage. Helping teenagers recover and receive the treatment that they need is important. Teenagers are still very young, and they still do genuinely stand a chance of getting their lives together if they receive adequate support.

If you think or know that your teenager is taking drugs, you need to take action now, because the longer you wait, the harder it will be to deal with your teenager’s drug use